Your web-browser is very outdated, and as such, this website may not display properly. Please consider upgrading to a modern, faster and more secure browser. Click here to do so.

Manifest Photography. The f-stops here.

Behind the scenes look at the commercial work and personal projects of Dan Jackson / Manifest Photography. Insight into my creative process, opinions, articles, discussions & occasional bumptious bloviations.

http://www.manifestphotography.com

Vancouver B.C., Canada
Oct 16 '13

This is the job that never ends:

This is the job that never ends 
Yes it goes on and on my friends
I started Photoshopping it so very long ago
And I’ll continue editing forever ‘cuz you know
This is the job that never ends…

Mar 16 '13
Feb 6 '13
Turtle Toaster poster. From my upcoming exhibit “A loaf of bread, a flask of wine, a book of verse -and thou.”

Turtle Toaster poster. From my upcoming exhibit “A loaf of bread, a flask of wine, a book of verse -and thou.”

Jan 19 '13

A loaf of bread, a flask of wine, a book of verse -and thou

My sixth solo exhibit (which features the longest title yet) explores the role of bread in history. Borrowing from different eras and genres of art from the Italian Renaissance, Dutch Baroque, French Impressionism to 20th Century advertising and Pop Art I have undertaken to investigate how bread has shaped the world. It’s a lot more interesting than you’d think!

For those who have never attended my previous shows they are not your typical stuffy artsy-fartsy affair where people in suits wax poetic over high art while sipping Shiraz. It will actually be fun. (And hopefully thought provoking and interesting.) There will be art, music, a variety of breads, intriguing cocktails and other festive libations to consume.

And of course really really cool & creative people like you who support the arts.
Look forward to seeing you there.

https://www.facebook.com/events/131860793646464/

Jan 3 '13
Converting my Classic Broncolor into a Funky Floor Lamp.
After removing the guts of the strobe and properly disposing of the battery cells (contact your local recycling centre on how to safely dispose of them) I reassembled the chassis. Two screws, a few yards of copper wire and 3 circuit boards that look like something from a sci-fi movie were the only things left over.
I then removed a standard light mount from a pot light I bought at the hardware store. With a pair of tin snips was able to expand the original mount that held the flash tube and mount the new light socket in it’s place. I then fed a power cord with switch through the back plate where the original power cord was fed and attached it to the light socket with a pair of marrets. It all remains nicely hidden inside the chassis.
Besides the aesthetics of it (it really does look like a rocket booster) this is one of the most functional and versatile lamps you could ask for. I can place a variety of reflectors, umbrellas, grids, softboxes onto the mount to create an endless variety of lighting scenarios in the living room.
Now I just need to break the habit of flipping the original model light toggle switch on the back when attempting to turn it on and off.

Converting my Classic Broncolor into a Funky Floor Lamp.

After removing the guts of the strobe and properly disposing of the battery cells (contact your local recycling centre on how to safely dispose of them) I reassembled the chassis. Two screws, a few yards of copper wire and 3 circuit boards that look like something from a sci-fi movie were the only things left over.

I then removed a standard light mount from a pot light I bought at the hardware store. With a pair of tin snips was able to expand the original mount that held the flash tube and mount the new light socket in it’s place. I then fed a power cord with switch through the back plate where the original power cord was fed and attached it to the light socket with a pair of marrets. It all remains nicely hidden inside the chassis.

Besides the aesthetics of it (it really does look like a rocket booster) this is one of the most functional and versatile lamps you could ask for. I can place a variety of reflectors, umbrellas, grids, softboxes onto the mount to create an endless variety of lighting scenarios in the living room.

Now I just need to break the habit of flipping the original model light toggle switch on the back when attempting to turn it on and off.

Jan 3 '13
Converting my Classic Broncolor into a Funky Floor Lamp.
My first strobe kit was a used set of Broncolor monoheads from the 1970’s. About 12 years ago two of the three crapped out and the repairman I sent them to scavenged one for parts. It rendered one of them useless but I couldn’t bring myself to toss it in the trash. I always felt the ubiquitous “Broncolor Turquoise”, the aluminum construction and beautiful proportions had potential to make for a cool piece of furniture. It looks like a rocket booster!
I’ve been told that the batteries can hold a charge for up to 6 years. The thought of them discharging 800 watt/seconds of power in my face frightened me but after sitting idle in my mom’s basement for over ten years I decided it was likely safe to set about converting the unit into a floor lamp.
I unscrewed the rear ring plate. It’s pretty damn sinister looking inside. Do I cut the red wire first or the blue one? I started snipping one wire at a time and removing circuit boards. More screws more wires, more circuit boards. I felt like I was diffusing a bomb. *Do not try this at home.

Converting my Classic Broncolor into a Funky Floor Lamp.

My first strobe kit was a used set of Broncolor monoheads from the 1970’s. About 12 years ago two of the three crapped out and the repairman I sent them to scavenged one for parts. It rendered one of them useless but I couldn’t bring myself to toss it in the trash. I always felt the ubiquitous “Broncolor Turquoise”, the aluminum construction and beautiful proportions had potential to make for a cool piece of furniture. It looks like a rocket booster!

I’ve been told that the batteries can hold a charge for up to 6 years. The thought of them discharging 800 watt/seconds of power in my face frightened me but after sitting idle in my mom’s basement for over ten years I decided it was likely safe to set about converting the unit into a floor lamp.

I unscrewed the rear ring plate. It’s pretty damn sinister looking inside. Do I cut the red wire first or the blue one? I started snipping one wire at a time and removing circuit boards. More screws more wires, more circuit boards. I felt like I was diffusing a bomb. *Do not try this at home.

Nov 8 '12

Mine! But you can use it :)

Yes, Bill C-11 has some drawbacks and aspects of it are controversial (especially when it comes to internet privacy). On the upside, there’s this if you’re a photographer living & working in Canada:

http://www.petapixel.com/2012/11/07/canadian-photogs-now-officially-own-the-copyright-to-all-of-their-photos/#kL33yVHm4KcwQS3b.01

Oct 28 '12
Oct 27 '12
A Hallowe’eny image. Apologue -The bat and the Bees.

A Hallowe’eny image. Apologue -The bat and the Bees.

Oct 16 '12
“Tiki Tableau.” Made the image into a faded 1960’s style postcard. This was a fun shoot. Every Tuesday resident tiki expert Donnie “Bahama” converts Clough Club in Vancouver’s Gastown into a classic tiki lounge. It’s a hell of a fun time.

“Tiki Tableau.” Made the image into a faded 1960’s style postcard. This was a fun shoot. Every Tuesday resident tiki expert Donnie “Bahama” converts Clough Club in Vancouver’s Gastown into a classic tiki lounge. It’s a hell of a fun time.

Oct 16 '12
"Tiki Tableau." This was a fun shoot. Every Tuesday resident tiki expert Donnie "Bahama" converts Clough Club in Vancouver’s Gastown into a classic tiki lounge. It’s a hell of a fun time.

"Tiki Tableau." This was a fun shoot. Every Tuesday resident tiki expert Donnie "Bahama" converts Clough Club in Vancouver’s Gastown into a classic tiki lounge. It’s a hell of a fun time.

Oct 1 '12

SHOOTING APRONS FOR GLOVES.

(Above: Craig “Old Timey” Kenzie, Mark “The Machine” Louie)

I’ve been hesitant to write this blog post because I don’t want to be self-indulgent or steal anyone’s thunder. Aprons For Gloves and The Restaurant Rumble is about community. But this is a blog about the work I do and I was privileged to be given a supporting role and unique perspective on this worthwhile project. I literally had a ring side seat.

Oct 1 '12
I love coffee and cocktails and I know many of the best baristas and bartenders in this city. When images of them striking (mostly absurd) boxing stances starting popping up on Twitter and facebook I had to find out what it was all about.

Sitting in Pourhouse I asked Patrick about Aprons For Gloves. He introduced me to Nick who explained that the old boxing gym on the Downtown Eastside had closed it’s doors and the kids that trained there had nowhere to go.

I love coffee and cocktails and I know many of the best baristas and bartenders in this city. When images of them striking (mostly absurd) boxing stances starting popping up on Twitter and facebook I had to find out what it was all about.

Sitting in Pourhouse I asked Patrick about Aprons For Gloves. He introduced me to Nick who explained that the old boxing gym on the Downtown Eastside had closed it’s doors and the kids that trained there had nowhere to go.

Oct 1 '12
(Above: Dennis “The Steamroller” Brock)
This wasn’t just any gym. It was a safe haven for at-risk youth. Over the years Coach Dave became a mentor to many of these kids. He doesn’t just train them, he advocates for them. He checks their report cards, he talks to their parents, teaches them self-respect and champions them both inside and outside the ring. He will tell you that he’s less interested in nurturing the next boxing prodigy and more interested in creating responsible young men and women who will go on to contribute to their community.

(Above: Dennis “The Steamroller” Brock)

This wasn’t just any gym. It was a safe haven for at-risk youth. Over the years Coach Dave became a mentor to many of these kids. He doesn’t just train them, he advocates for them. He checks their report cards, he talks to their parents, teaches them self-respect and champions them both inside and outside the ring. He will tell you that he’s less interested in nurturing the next boxing prodigy and more interested in creating responsible young men and women who will go on to contribute to their community.

Oct 1 '12
(Above: Chris “The Coffee Grinder” Giannakos) 
Nick set up a charity called Aprons For Gloves to raise funds to build a new gym. www.apronsforgloves.com and was producing a charity boxing match called The Restaurant Rumble. The gorgeous documentary series by Warren Lane Productions. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0WYFs5HkD80&feature=relmfu explains it better than I ever could.

(Above: Chris “The Coffee Grinder” Giannakos)

Nick set up a charity called Aprons For Gloves to raise funds to build a new gym. www.apronsforgloves.com and was producing a charity boxing match called The Restaurant Rumble. The gorgeous documentary series by Warren Lane Productions. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0WYFs5HkD80&feature=relmfu explains it better than I ever could.